BlogPageWelcome to my blog -- Grace's Rantings

I have made a study of human communication -- interpersonal as well as mass media.  I am intrigued by tremendous changes in human interaction in recent years.  The computer, Internet, smart phones and social media have dramatically changed the way we interact with each other.  Human discourse hasn't changed, but the mediums by which we communicate have..."and that has made all the difference".

 

Please share your thoughts and join in the discussion. I welcome your input and comments!

 

E-Reader vs. Book?

I saw this cartoon on Facebook and thought it was very funny.  Old school triumphing over new school!   But I must admit that I am one of those people who love reading on my kindle.  I wouldn't part with it.  I am also one of those people who try to convince everyone of the convenience and ease of reading on a kindle. 

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However, I wasn't always a e-book reader.  As a matter of fact, I started out as one of those people who kept saying, "I love books; I love touching them, smelling them.  I love seeing the book spines lined on on the book shelf."

But after moving boxes and boxes of these lovely books around with me over the years, and ending up with much less space to display them, I am down to a small bookcase of only the books I truly love (mostly fantasy series), and a box of children's books in my basement that I couldn't part with.  However I now have many, many books stored on my kindle.  And with the kindle app on my phone, I always have access to my books.  When I find myself with some time to spare, I don't have to say, "Oh I wish I had my book".  It is always handy!

What is your preference e-reader or paper book?  And if you say book, have you ever tried reading on a kindle (or Nook or I-pad, etc?)

Do you own a laptop or desktop?

I’ve come across some interesting facts and figures on computer ownership from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

Computer ownership continues to increase, with 76% of all Americans owning a computer; although this still skews younger -- 88% of younger Americans (aged 18-29) own a computer while only 45% of those aged 65+ are computer owners. But what kind of computer are they using?

We appear to be trading in our desktops for laptops. In 2006, 68% of Americans owned a desktop, while only 30% owned a laptop. However in 2010, ownership of desktops has dropped to 59% while laptop ownership has increased to 52%. I know I’ve owned a laptop exclusively for over 3 years now. As a matter of fact I just purchased a new laptop!

As might be expected, among younger adults (18-29), laptops are far more prevalent, 72% of this demographic group owns a laptop while only 56% have a desktop computer. Older demographic groups are more likely to own a desktop:
-- 30-49-year-olds: 61% own a laptop and 67% own a desktop.
-- 50-64-year-olds: 44% own a laptop and 63% own a desktop
But then the trend reverses for the 65 and older group: 39% own a laptop and 31% own a desktop; perhaps because their kids are making the recommendation for them?

Another interesting statistic, a higher percentage of US adults own a mobile phone than own a computer, 85% of Americans now own a cell phone (also according to the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project). Of course this isn’t surprising. A family may share one or two computers, but everyone has their own cell phone. 96% of adults aged 18-to-29 own a cell phone.